IKEA The Scraps Cook Book

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IKEA The Scraps Cook Book

IKEA The Scraps Cook Book

INTRODUCTION

We believe the kitchen is the heart of the home. It’s where we gather, share, and celebrate on a daily basis. So it’s not surprising that, because of how much living we do there, the kitchen is where the most waste is produced — especially food waste. It’s so easy for us to buy just a little too much food and have it end up in the compost or the trash. Almost everyone has done this at one time or another, so the kitchen tends to be a wasteful place. But it doesn’t have to be.

That’s why IKEA has created The ScrapsBook, in collaboration with chefs from across North America. This cookbook is dedicated to cooking with the little things we usually throw away. Or, as we like to call it, “scrapbooking.” Scrapbooking is about finding the beautiful possibilities in that banana peel, radish top, or even the chicken bones you’re about to toss, and making the most of everything available to you. It’s little things like these that can add up to make a big difference.

Our homes and the way we live have a huge impact on the planet, our health, and our well-being. This is why we’re committed to creating a better everyday life for the many people, and why we believe those lives are truly better when they’re lived sustainably. It’s a principle that we’ve always strived to follow — from how we operate as a business, to how we create and evolve our products over the years. We believe it all comes down to the big difference that comes from small changes. And that’s what this book is all about — the little things. So little, you might even call them “scraps.”

Happy scrapbooking!

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PLANTCAKES IKEA

FRENCH PRESS TOAST

THINK OUTSIDE THE KITCHEN

There are all kinds of ways to make the most of your scraps, and they don’t all have to happen in the kitchen. If you keep a garden in your backyard, on your balcony, or even in your home, here are a few ideas on how your scraps can help you grow.

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  • Sprinkle used coffee grounds throughout your garden as a simple composting tool.
  • Drop a few banana peels into a bucket of water and let sit for a few days. This will become a potassium and phosphorus-rich “compost tea” for your garden and houseplants.
  • Grind cleaned and cracked eggshells into a calcium powder that makes for a great natural fertilizer.
  • Rub the soft side of a banana peel on the leaves of houseplants to shine them up and remove dust — this is great for plant health.

SCRAPPY SKILLET

WILTED SMOOTHIE

NO-WASTE OMELETTE

HOW TO BEAT WHAT YOU CAN’T EAT

It’s true — there are some food scraps that you just can’t eat. Things like eggshells, coffee grounds, etc. But even they don’t need to go in the trash. Here are some ideas on what you can do with the food scraps you can’t eat but don’t want to throw out.

  • Grind eggshells into a calcium powder to remove limestone deposits in your bathroom.
  • Place cucumber peels at entrance points in your home to deter ants.
  • You can use a small, dried bread crust like an organic sponge. It can soak up oils and scrub hardened food from your cast iron pans.
  • Make a homemade air freshener. You can take leftover fruit scraps and boil them in some water on the stove to make your home smell sweet and fresh.
  • Use sliced lemon to rub coarse salt on a
    cutting board to clean it.
  • Dry lemon or orange peels, then add them to your homemade vinegar cleaning solution. The citrus oils will help dissolve grease and add antibacterial power.
  • Hold onto used, fine coffee grounds and use as an exfoliant — just whip up a DIY face or body scrub.

BANANA PEEL BACON & WILD RICE PANCAKES

WATERMELON RIND JAM & STR AWBERRY TOP FETA SPREAD

FORGOTTEN VEGETABLE STEW

CORN HUSK SMOKED CHICKEN

CRISPER PESTO PASTA

THE 3 P’S

Pickle, preserve, and pesto. Think of this as a kitchen mantra (or a delightful tongue twister). For just about every fruit, vegetable, or herb you can think of, there’s at least one pickle, preserve, or pesto you can turn it into. Turn your wilting greens into pesto. Save up your bruised fruit in the freezer and turn it into jam. Pickle your wrinkling veggies and enjoy them later.

You can also use herbs, garlic, chilies, and lemons to infuse cooking oil. Your taste buds will be most grateful. Use a simple jar or bottle like KORKEN and watch the magic happen.

SAUCE PACKET MEATLOAF

MAC & RINDS

FLOTSAM FILO PIE

BANANA PEEL CHUTNEY ON SHRIMP

HOW TO BUILD YOUR OWN BACKYARD COMPOST

  1. One way to cut out even more food waste from your life at home is to build your own compost system in your backyard. It takes a bit of work — having a totally sustainable kitchen isn’t always easy. But we’re going to try to break it down anyway! (That’s a little compost joke. Get it? “Break it down.” You’ll get it.)
  2. You can use either an open pile or a compost bin. Bins have the advantage of being neat, keeping animals out, and preserving heat. You can purchase compost bins from a variety of garden and home stores, or you can build your own.
  3. First, choose a location with access to a water source, in an area that receives moderate sunlight. Too much sun can dry out the composting material, but the added heat from sunlight is necessary.

GREEN

  • Vegetable and fruit scraps
  • Fresh grass clippings
  • Egg and nutshells
  • Coffee grounds
  • Teabags
  • Bread products
  • Manure
  • Flat beer

BROWN

  • Cardboard products
  • Dead leaves, branches, pine cones, and needles
  • Paper egg cartons
  • Sawdust and hay
  • Untreated wood
  • Tissues and newspaper
  • Lint
  • Shredded junk mail
  • Wine corks

HOW TO BUILD YOUR OWN BACKYARD COMPOST

  1. Assemble your greens and browns. You’ll need both nitrogen-based (green) and carbon-based materials (brown) for a successful compost system. Maintain a ratio of green to brown at about 1:2.
  2. Set up your bin on well-drained soil. Fill your backyard compost bin with a 6-inch layer of browns and a 2- to 3-inch layer of greens.
  3. Water until moist, but not soggy. It should feel similar to a damp sponge.
  4. Repeat the layering process by alternating layers of green and brown.
  5. Now you’re ready to add your scraps. Collect your kitchen compostables in a container in your kitchen. Find a handy place to store this container — on the counter, under the sink, or in the freezer. Whenever it’s full, empty its contents into the compost bin. Whenever you add food scraps or yard waste, be sure to top it with a layer of browns. If you don’t, your compost will stay wet and take forever to break down.
  6. Mix the compost once a week to help break down and eliminate odor.
  7. Within 4 to 6 months, you should have finished compost. Use it to sprinkle your lawn, feed your garden, and keep your kitchen as waste-free as possible.
  8. Repeat steps 7 to 9 and enjoy!

CRUMB-Y GREEN LASAGNA

BBQ FISH COLLARS

STRIPLOIN & SCRAPPY SIDES

RADISH TOP RISOTTO

KALE STEM PESTO TAGLIATELLE

SWEET & SCR APPY MEATBALLS

GROW & REGROW

We all know better than to throw away a perfectly good vegetable, but what about the scraps? Aside from boiling them up as broth, did you know that spring onions, leeks, and many other vegetables can be completely regrown? Simply place the vegetable’s rooted base into a jar filled with water, and watch it grow back right before your eyes.

Store-bought herbs are pricey, have a short shelf-life, and almost always come wrapped in layers of plastic. Even if you don’t have a garden, a sunny windowsill is all the space you need to start growing your own. And your kitchen will look even lovelier for it.

Here’s a list of 10 veggies you can easily regrow. Simply place these in a glass with a little bit of water to cover the bottom of the root or stalk — just don’t submerge them!

  1. Bok choy
  2. Cabbage
  3. Carrot tops
  4. Celery stalks
  5. Fennel
  6. Garlic chives
  7. Green onion
  8. Leeks
  9. Lemongrass
  10. Lettuce

Before something goes into the compost bin, give it a second look. If what you’re about to toss has roots, you can probably regrow it. You can regrow vegetables like green onions in any glass, like SÄLLSKAPLIG.

PULP BURGERS WITH DIY JALAPEÑO CHEESE

STALK TACOS

SKINNIES

HONEY-ROASTED WHOLE CARROTS

SPARE FISH CROQUETTES

MISFIT SCRAPS

We all have our little misfit scraps — the ones that seem like an inconvenience to keep around. Things like that half-finished can of beans or that half of zucchini that’s just a little too big or small to place in any of your containers. Our first instinct can be to reach for a single-use plastic food wrap to help keep things fresh. But unusual scraps call for unusual solutions. Try wrapping your misfits in something like wax paper — the common kind you’d use for baking. Then, when you’re done with it, don’t toss it — give it a rinse and set it aside to use again.

Got oddly shaped bits of produce, beverages or runoff that you don’t know what to do with? Don’t let them wither away or get sent down the drain — try sealing them up with a reusable, washable cover like ÖVERMÄTT instead of single-use food wrap.

MISFIT

PEEL-CHOS

BOTTOM-OFTHE-BAG CHIP & CHEESE FRITTERS

CHICKEN & BITS SANDWICH SPREAD

SEE MORE OF WHAT YOU STORE

The first law of food waste: if you can see it, you’ll eat it. That’s why neat, transparent food storage is so important. It helps you to keep stock of what food you already have, so you’ll use it before it expires and skip unnecessary extra trips to the supermarket. The fresh food can last a bit longer and you’ll remember what to eat first.

Leftovers from dinner can go into a food container, rather than the bin. You can chill or freeze them for a quick and easy lunch on another day

Glass containers like IKEA 365+ are ovenproof, so you can store, heat, and serve all from the same dish. That cuts down on the washing-up too, which means you’re also saving water.

SEE MORE OF WHAT YOU STORE

NOT-SO-STALE BREAD PUDDING

PUMPKIN BOWL SOUP

CORN COB SOUP

LEFTOVER CHICKEN RAMEN

CLEAR-OUT-THE-CRISPER SOUP

OLD BAG, NEW TRICKS

This is an obvious one, but it’s always worth a reminder: an easy way to cut down on waste is to remember to use your reusable bags when you go grocery shopping. It’s so easy to forget them if you keep them in places where they stay out of sight — at home, in the car, in the closet, under the sink. So instead, keep them in a place you’ll always notice them on your way out the door.

And another thing: when you get to the grocery store, try not to use produce bags. They’re one more single-use plastic that can be easily avoided — and besides, you’ve already brought plenty of bags anyway!

Try to bring more bags than you need. You can always leave the ones you don’t end up using inside the bags you do.

You probably already have a FRAKTA at home. It’s sturdy enough for your biggest grocery trips and pretty enough to use as storage for your other, more unsightly bags.

OLD BAG, NEW TRICKS

SPARE PARTS PANZANELLA

WHOLE CELERY SALAD

AGED VEGGIE SALAD

DON’T-THROWOUT-A-THING DUMPLING SOUP

CHOCOLATE & BANANA PEEL CAKE

WHOLE RADISH PISTOU

BEET BIT CHIPS

JACK-O’-LANTERN LEFTOVERS

PINEAPPLE CROWN BUDINO

THE RIGHT SORT OF WASTE

Food packaging is responsible for about one-third of all Canadian household waste. That’s a lot of packaging, and much of it ends up going to the dump because we so often throw everything into one big recycling bin. But not all packaging is created equal — what can actually be recycled depends on your municipality. Consult your local guidelines to make sure that the pieces that can be recycled, are, instead of going right to the landfill. Then you can keep your home neater and make a positive environmental impact by sorting your packaging material across several receptacles.

Sort your waste with a bin system like HÅLLBAR to keep your kitchen neat and your food scraps and other waste separated.

THE RIGHT SORT OF WASTE

PRAWN PIECE CHIPS

SECOND STEEP PUDDING POTS

BRUISED APPLE BUTTER CAKE

STEM & CHEESE CRACKERS

POST-WEEKEND PEAR & COFFEE CAKE

LAST-CHANCE BANANA & PB ICE CREAM


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